PALS WINTER 2023 CLASSES

Come To Our Enrichment Classes

PALS (Perimeter Adult Learning Services) is pleased to announce that it will be presenting classes for the Winter 2023 session running for 8 weeks on Mondays, January 9th – March 6th (No class January 16th). The classes will be at Dunwoody United Methodist Church once again.  A detailed description of the classes is as follows:

10:00 am – 11:00 am — Spies, Saboteurs and Rescuers During World War II — Dan O’Lone will present a fascinating look at double and even triple agents who played key roles in saving thousands of Allied lives during World War II. He will also continue with his unique take on those who rescued Jews during the War, including sewer cleaners, zookeepers, circus performers and German soldiers, as well as the man who stopped the trains to Auschwitz, a diplomat from a country that he had never been to. 

10:00 am – 11:00 am — Andrew Jackson and His Indian Wars — Tom McElhinny will continue his series on Native Americans, this time dealing with Andrew Jackson’s presidency and his Indian wars from his first battles with the Cherokee and Creek nations until the establishment of the Indian Territory in Oklahoma.  The most infamous outcome of Jackson’s relentless exploits at Indian removal culminated with one of the greatest forced migrations in history-the Trail of Tears. It is a sobering reminder of a violent and dark episode in our nation’s history.

10:00 am – 1:45 pm   Mah Jongg – Bring your own Mah Jongg card and come play.  There is no instructor for the session- just fun and self-evaluation.

11:15 am – 12:15 pm — A History of the Space Race —  John Baumbusch will take us through the history of how we got to the Moon more than 50 years ago. He will discuss moon lore, the Cold War, Russians and the Right Stuff! Through this series, we will re-live the heady days of the Space Race from the 1950s to the 1970s.

11:15 am – 12:15 pm — The Economic Implications of Immigration — Shai Robkin will discuss how immigration is a misunderstood topic in America’s social discourse, with much of what we believe is based largely on myth.  He will compare the experiences of immigrants from the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries to those of immigrants today, and how immigrants and their children compare educationally, professionally and economically with US born citizens and discuss the policy implications of what we find.